546
Chicken Genome
TPM4
Mouse
Chicken
Mouse
Chicken
Mouse
Chicken
Mouse
Chicken
20k
22k
24k
26k
28k
30k
32k
34k
36k
38k
40k
40k
42k
TPM4
MEL
44k
46k
48k
50k
52k
54k
56k
58k
60k
60k
62k
64k
66k
68k
MEL
70k
72k
74k
76k
78k
80k
80k
82k
84k
86k
88k
90k
92k
94k
96k
98k
100k
2
81
2
34
5
6
3
4
56
7
8
Fig. 5
Comparison of a segment of human chromosome 19p13.1 (contig NT
011295), with
orthologous regions in the chicken and mouse genomes using the PipMaker program.
that most exons are visible as conserved
sequences even at the nucleotide level.
7
ESTs
There is a large collection of chicken ex-
pressed sequence tags (ESTs) available
(450 795 dbEST release 081503), which
is an indispensable tool for annotating
the physical map of the genome. EST
programs include those carried out at
the University of Delaware and the GSF
(see www.chicken-genome.org for a com-
plete summary). A large EST resource
was funded in the United Kingdom by
the BBSRC. This recent BBSRC project
collected 340 000 ESTs generated from li-
braries taken from 21 different tissues,
both adult and embryonic. Analysis of
the data from this project gives an esti-
mate of 35 000 chicken genes. Although
the chicken genome is only about 40%
of the size of the human genome, it
is currently estimated to contain about
the same number of genes. Furthermore,
the microchromosomes (a third of the
chicken genome) contain twice as many
genes as the macrochromosomes. Thus,
the chicken genome is compact.
Annotation of the EST data from the
BBSRC project revealed that about 40%
of clustered sequences have orthologs in
known sequence databases. Furthermore,
the chicken EST resource showed strong
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